Search Documents

60 Documents foundEdit Search

Sort by: Title, Date, Type

  • | Illustration

    Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, August 11, 1877, full page

    This August 11, 1877 full page from Leslie's Illustrated demonstrates the impact groupings of illustrations had in this type of periodical.

  • | Illustration

    Mob Threatens the Ninth Regiment

    This August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicts the crowd threatening infantrymen of the Ninth New York State National Guard in Albany on July 24, 1877. Such discussions tested the loyalties of local and state militias, as strikers justified their cause and gained solidarity with militia.

  • | Illustration

    Rioters Tearing Up Rails at the Bridge at Corning

    This August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicts strikers tearing up the track and bridge near Corning, New York in advance of an oncoming engine. These confrontations were both organized and spontaneous, dependent on the deep experience and expertise of the railroad workers with the operation of the roads.

  • | Illustration

    Robert M. Ammon Directs the Strikers

    This August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicts Robert M. Ammon, leader of the Pittsburgh and Fort Wayne strike, sending information to the strikers via telegraph.

  • | Illustration

    Scene in the Armory of the Seventh Regiment, N.G.S.N.Y. The troops awaiting orders.

    During the strikes, New York's Seventh Regiment occupied the armory for several days in preparation for violence in the city. Although there were several large meetings held, no mob action took place in New York.

  • | Illustration

    Taking Posession of the West Albany Freight Yards

    This August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicts the firmness and order of the Ninth New York State National Guard Regiment as it takes "posession" of the West Albany, New York freight yards on July 24, 1877, in the face of a pressing crowd.

  • | Illustration

    The Blockade of Engines at Martinsburg, West Virginia

    This August 11, 1877 image depicts the blockade of railroad engines in Martinsburg, West Virginia, by orderly and well-dressed citizens. Unlike Allan Pinkerton's depictions, this Harper's illustration features the role of women less as unruly participants and more as witnesses and forces of restraint and care in the stand-off.

  • | Illustration

    The Burning of the Lebanon Valley Railroad Bridge, August 11, 1877

    This August 11, 1877 image from Harper's Weekly depicts the burning of the Lebanon Valley Railroad bridge by rioters during the Great Railroad Strike.

  • | Illustration

    The Police Watching, In Concealement, The Crowd in Tompkins Square

    Although there was no large-scale unrest in New York, crowds did gather in Tompkins Square during the Railroad Strike. Tompkins Square had been the site of civil unrest and rioting at several points in New York history, including during the 1863 Draft Riots, and police feared speakers would rile up strike supporters.

  • | Illustration

    The Ruins at Pittsburgh

    This August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicts the smoldering ruins of the roundhouse and shops at Pittsburgh after the riots. Such scenes of devastation, rendered from the vantage point and perspective to see the whole scope, were similar to images of destruction in the Civil War.

  • | Illustration

    The Sixth Regiment Figthing Its Way Through Baltimore

    This August 11, 1877 image from Harper's Weekly depicts the Sixth Regiment fighting its way through Baltimore.

  • | Illustration

    The Strike on the Erie Railroad

    An August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicting masses of strike supporters stoppping a train at Corning, New York, even as armed soldiers make their presence known.

  • | Illustration

    Workingmen's Mass Meeting in Tompkin's Square, Wednesday Evening, July 25th

    An August 11, 1877 image from Leslie's Illustrated depicting a New York City meeting in Tompkins Square; both supporters and opponents of the strike are visible in the image. Note the placard to the side of the stage: "Our Strength Lies in the Justice of Our Demands Let the Workingmen of the World Unite."

  • | Illustration

    "The Moral of the Strikes"

    An illustration of "The Moral of the Strikes" which emphasizes their cost to working-class women and children.

  • | Illustration

    Governor Hartranft's Headquarters on a Car of the Pennsylvania Railroad company, At Pittsburgh.

    The conjunction of military and governmental forces in opposition to the riot is shown in this illustration.

  • | Illustration

    Pittsburgh Policemen Recovering Property Stolen by the Mob in the Recent Riots

    On August 18, 1877, Leslie's Illustrated depicted the confiscation of property taken during the riots. Note that goods are being removed from working-class homes, to the distress of women and children.

  • | Illustration

    Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, August 4, 1877, full page

    This August 4, 1877 full page from Leslie's Illustrated demonstrates the impact groupings of illustrations had in this type of periodical.

  • | Illustration

    Attempt to Burn Camden Depot

    Railroad detective Allan Pinkerton's history of the strike emphasized the unruliness of the mob and the threat of foreign, anarchist, and communist influences on American labor. Here, his illustration shows the rioters' attempt to burn down Baltimore's Camden Station during the 1877 railroad strike.

  • | Illustration

    Firing into a Mob on Baltimore Street

    Railroad detective Allan Pinkerton's history of the strike emphasized the unruliness of the mob and the threat of foreign, anarchist, and communist influences on American labor. Here, his illustration shows the military defending law and order, firing their weapons into a mob in Baltimore during the 1877 strike.

  • | Illustration

    Women Leading a Mob in Baltimore

    Railroad detective Allan Pinkerton's history of the strike emphasized the unruliness of the mob and the threat of foreign, anarchist, and communist influences on American labor. He also emphasized the role of women in inciting the conflict. Here, his illustration shows women leading a mob against the police during the 1877 railroad strike in Baltimore.