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  • | Newspaper

    A General Riot

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American describes the scene of the riot near the Sixth Maryland Regiment armory.

  • | Newspaper

    A General Strike

    This article from the July 20, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American gives an account of the strike and notes the military's effectiveness at calming the mob, but the reluctance of railroad workers to return to work.

  • | Newspaper

    A Perilous Nightófireóriotómurder

    This editorial from the July 21, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American emphasizes the strike and violence was preventable if adequate police had been on the scene and available.

  • | Newspaper

    An Alarm Of Fire

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American describes the mob setting fire to railroad passenger cars and an engine.

  • | Newspaper

    At The Hospital

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American describes scenes from the hospital after the Baltimore riots.

  • | Newspaper

    Bad Temper Of The Crowd

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American describes the attitude of the crowd during the Baltimore riots.

  • | Newspaper

    Carroll's Second Proclamation

    On July 21, 1877 Maryland Governor John L. Carroll issued a second proclamation, asking the state's citizens to maintain law and order.

  • | Newspaper

    Determined to Fight

    This article from the July 20, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American notes the attitude of the railroad workers toward any attempted to break up the strike.

  • | Newspaper

    Dispatches from General French and Colonel Delaplaine

    This excerpt from the July 18, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American lists several military dispatches in response to the strike, including correspondence from West Virginia Governor Henry M. Matthews asking Secretary of War George W. McCrary for assistance and tactical messages between the field commanders.

  • | Newspaper

    Failure To Close The Drinking Houses

    This letter to the editor, printed in the July 22, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American, asks why saloons in Baltimore remained open, even after receiving the order to close, and seemed to indicate the ineffectiveness of the police in the situation.

  • | Newspaper

    Federal Troops to Quell the Strike

    This article from the July 19, 1877 edition of the Baltimore American details the events that led to the Federal government sending troops to disperse the rioters.

  • | Newspaper

    Garrett Announces Wage Reduction

    This July 11, 1877 circular announces a wage reduction for workers on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

  • | Newspaper

    General French Ordered To Send Troops

    This July 23, 1877 article in the Baltimore American notes Secretary of War George W. McCrary's order to General William H. French to send troops to Cumberland, Maryland to "suppress the riot."

  • | Newspaper

    Governor Carroll's Proclamation

    In this July 20, 1877 proclamation, Maryland Governor John L. Carroll asks the citizens of Maryland to abstain from acts of lawlessness and assist the authorities in maintaining law and order. Carroll refers to the strike as a "conspiracy" to interfere with the business of the railroad.

  • | Newspaper

    Governor Matthews Explains

    West Virginia Governor Henry M. Matthews replies to Secretary of War George McCrary's request for more information about the state's military strength, noting that some of the state and local militia were sympathetic to the strikers. He also claims that U.S. troops are necessary to prevent "bloodshed."

  • | Newspaper

    Governor Matthews' Letter

    West Virginia Governor Henry M. Mathews requests United States troops to quell what he called "domestic violence" and to stop the activities of what he deemed "unlawful combinations."

  • | Newspaper

    Hayes' July 21 Proclamation: A Manifesto Against Domestic Violence

    On July 21, 1877, President Rutherford B. Hayes issued a proclamation ordering all strikers to disperse and return home. He noted that a state of "domestic violence" existed in Cumberland, Maryland, and "along the line" of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

  • | Newspaper

    In The March Towards Camden Station

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American describes the mob's attack of the Sixth Maryland Regiment and recounts the violence that occurred during its march to Camden Station.

  • | Newspaper

    Killed And Wounded

    This article from the July 21, 1877 issue of the Baltimore American lists the killed and wounded and describes their wounds in detail.

  • | Newspaper

    Last Night in Baltimore

    This article from the July 21, 1877 Baltimore American gives an account of the events that led to the large gathering of people outside of Camden Station the previous evening.