Sioux Falls, SD Speech, 1896-10-09

Speech by William Jennings Bryan.

Speech by William Jennings Bryan
Friday, October 9, 1896 at 2:00pm
Outdoors, Sioux Falls, SD

Source: STAND IN THE RAIN, Ten Thousand People Brave the Elements to Welcome the Great Leader, Omaha World-Herald (Morning Edition), Saturday, October 10, 1896

"All things considered, this is one of the most remarkable meetings which it has been my privilege to address during this campaign. The interest which has been manifested, the zeal which you have shown, indicate a desire on the part of those who have turned out under these unfavorable circumstances to testify to their determination to do their duty in this campaign. (Cheers.) I appreciate the interest which you are taking. I appreciate the attendance of the battle-scarred veterans of this country (cheers) and I can assure them that their interest, the interest of the old soldier, will be safe in the hands of those who believe that this nation is great enough to attend to its own business. (Cheers.) The soldier will not find it necessary to put his interest in the hands of those who believe that we must procure the consent of foreign nations before we can act our lives on the financial policy." (Cheers.)

PETTIGREW WAS MANLY.

"I am glad to come to this city, because in coming it gives me a chance to say a word in defense of Senator Pettigrew among his own people. (Tremendous cheering.) My friends, there are times, there are occasions which try men's souls. To leave old party associates is not an easy matter, and far more difficult does that duty become when the person who leaves is one who received honors at the hands of his party, but, my friends, I believe Senator Pettigrew did the manly thing and the courageous thing when he determined to protect the interests of the people instead of bowing under the yoke of the gold standard. (Great cheering.)

...I am glad to have the bond syndicate against me, because when I am elected they will not come down and try to get me to sell bonds to them $1.04 when they are worth $1.19. (Continuous cheers.) But I notice this, my friends, that the people who have left the democratic party do not give their real reason for leaving: in fact I may be wrong to say they have left the party. They have been dragged out of the party by the great corporation interests that runs them, my friends." (Cheers.)

About this Document

  • Source: Omaha World-Herald (Morning Edition)
  • Published: Omaha, NE
  • Citation: 1
  • Date: October 9, 1896