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  • Letter from Joshua M. Shaffer to Samuel B. Reed, January 4, 1864

    In this letter from January 4, 1864, Joshua M. Shaffer, Surgeon of the Board of Enrollment for the First Congressional District of Iowa, writes to Samuel Reed informing him that his name has been successfully stricken from the draft enrollment list in Burlington, Iowa upon receipt of proof that his name is on the enrollment list in Joliet, Illinois.

  • Letter from Peter A. Dey to Samuel B. Reed, April 25, 1864

    In this letter from April 25, 1864, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, writes to Samuel Reed informing him that the Board of Directors has assigned him to survey the land between the Great Salt Lake Valley and Green River in Utah. He states that "President [Brigham] Young has volunteered to furnish you party and transportation for your work." Dey gives detailed descriptions of the areas through which the line will most likely have to be run, telling Reed that "it will be safe to sacrifice distance and straight lines to cost of construction."

  • Letter from Peter A. Dey to Samuel B. Reed, December 10, 1864

    In this letter from December 10, 1864, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, writes to Samuel Reed describing the way in which Reed should prepare his survey report for the Railroad's directors. Dey also mentions that Reed has his full support and that he (Dey) voiced this sentiment to members of the Board.

  • Letter from Jennie Reed, May 26, [1865]

    In this letter from May 26, 1865, Jennie Reed writes to her cousin Adda discussing various family matters and some of her activities during her stay in Burlington, Iowa. She notes that her husband, Samuel Reed, is in Mount Pleasant, Iowa that day and will soon go "out on the line for a month."

  • Letter from Sally A. Kendrick to Jennie Reed, August 2, 1865

    In this letter from August 2, 1865, Sally A. Kendrick writes to Jennie Reed, wife of Samuel Reed, discussing the war's end. She states that she is glad it ended "in the right way," with the abolishment of slavery. She also details her congregation's attempts to start a church hospital now that the military hospitals are all closed, and describes her work as a nurse during the war. Kendrick also notes that she has a nephew at Fort Laramie who is in charge of a company of former Rebels, and requests Mr. Reed make a visit if his work ever takes him out that far.

  • Letter from Jennie Reed to Friends at Home and Reed Children, October 9, 1866

    In this letter from October 9, 1866, Jennie Reed, wife of Samuel Reed, writes from Omaha, Nebraska to friends at home and the Reed children describing Samuel's ill health. She states that he has improved somewhat, though his symptoms linger. They hope "in a day or two there will be a decided change for the better." She tells the children to behave themselves and gives instructions for their care.

  • Report from Samuel B. Reed to Oliver Ames, 1867

    In this copy of a report from 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Oliver Ames, President of the Union Pacific Railroad, detailing the progress of the railroad's construction over the past year. He describes the totality of the work that has been done on the railroad from October 1, 1866 to September 1, 1867, giving very specific accounts of the miles of track laid, telegraph lines built, railroad ties used, bridges constructed, amount of earth and rock excavated during grading, and the like. He also discusses the great difficulty he has had in obtaining ties for the railroad, particularly from the Black Hills and in the area of Laurence Fork, Nebraska. He writes that there have been "serious delays in grading and in furnishing ties caused by the decided hostility of the Indians, our grading men have been frequently attacked, some men have been killed and a large amount of stock lost." Reed also includes an account of the materials on hand as of September 1, 1867.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Thomas C Durant, February 19, 1867

    In this letter from February 19, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Thomas Durant informing him that some of the estimates received from General Grenville Dodge for work on the track are much higher than what Reed and Durant anticipated when Reed was in New York .

  • Letter from Jennie Reed to Samuel B. Reed, February 22, 1867

    In this letter from February 22, 1867, Jennie Reed writes from Joliet, Illinois to her husband, Samuel Reed, in Omaha, Nebraska in answer to his complaints that he has not received letters from her. She, in turn, complains about the length of his letters while noting that she does not doubt he is busy enough that he has little time to write more. She also inquires about John R. Boyle's location, and tells her husband she is "so sorry that you feel so lonely yet you chose the sad part & would not let me go."

  • Letter from Jennie Reed to Samuel B. Reed, April 18, 1867

    In this letter from April 18, 1867, Jennie Reed writes to her husband, Samuel Reed, on the eve of the anniversary of their wedding day telling him how much she misses him. She insists he be careful about his health and write to her more often.

  • Letter from Sally A. Kendrick to Jennie Reed, June 19, 1867

    In this letter from June 19, 1867, Sally A. Kendrick writes to Jennie Reed, wife of Samuel Reed, thanking her for the books she sent. She notes she is glad to hear that Mr. Reed has recovered from his illness, and wishes she could travel "over the glorious West" to see them. She states she is "glad that the church has two such men on the Union Pacific Road as S.B. Reed & General Simpson," as they will spread good impressions of Christianity as they make their way further into the West.

  • Letter to Jennie Reed, August 15, 1867

    In this letter from August 15, 1867, Mina writes to her sister Jennie Reed, wife of Samuel Reed, discussing her experiences working in Atlanta, Georgia. She states that her pay for the last month was only twenty dollars, as she was only in Atlanta for eleven days. She tells Jennie Reed that she will write to a Mr. Knowlton the next week regarding a railway pass, and hopes to "get up home in a week or two."

  • Letter from Juliet L. Elwood to Jennie Reed, September 12, 1867

    In this letter from September 12, 1867, Juliet L. Elwood writes to Jennie Reed, wife of Samuel Reed, discussing plans to travel to St. Louis and the possibility of accompanying her on a trip to Omaha, Nebraska. She inquires about the prospects of Mrs. Reed procuring a railway pass for her for the journey. She also details an encounter she had on the railroad cars during a day trip to Joliet, Illinois with a "military gentleman" who knew Samuel Reed. She states that she "understood him to say he was Prest of Pacific Road, but I think I must of course have misunderstood, as Gen Dix is President, or was."

  • Letter from Grenville M. Dodge to Oliver Ames, December 11, 1867

    In this letter from December 11, 1867, Grenville Dodge writes to Oliver Ames discussing the need to make preparations and increase facilities for getting water along the railroad line. He tells Ames that unless such work is done, "you will find that it will be very costly to supply it each year from Stations or tanks."

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 30, 1867

    In this letter from December 30, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane advising him of changes to the schedule of production and shipment of railroad ties. He also discusses moving teams of workers to different sections of the line as a means to ensure that work will be completed in time to lay track in the spring.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 30, 1867

    In this letter from December 30, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane informing him of botched contract work east of Cheyenne. He explains what work should have been done, the work that was done, and the difference in cost to the company.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 31, 1867

    In this letter from December 31, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane regarding the status of payments for contract work done on truss bridges.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 31, 1867

    In this letter from December 31, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane describing the progress of the erection of telegraph lines near Saunders, Nebraska. He states that he cannot find anyone to do the grading work west of the Little Laramie River "at 30," as many who have been doing the grading over the past season have left the area for the winter. He recommends his friend John Boyle for the contract, if Boyle will agree to do the work at the rate of thirty cents.

  • Letter from Oliver Ames to Thomas C. Durant, January 1, 1868

    In this letter from January 1, 1868, Oliver Ames writes to Thomas C. Durant regarding the financial status of the Union Pacific Railroad. He notes that several creditors are "clamorous for money," but that the company has "really nothing to raise the money with." He tells Durant that it would be a disgrace to have to suspend construction for want of funds and advises him to "discharge all unnecessary men at once and get no more ties and timber than is absolutely necessary for the Work."

  • Catharine Brown, Complaint

    Catharine Brown filed suit against the Washington, Alexandria and Georgetown Railroad in March 1868, arguing that a month earlier she was forcibly and violently ejected from the ladies car in Alexandria, Virginia, because of her color. She sought damages of $20,000 to pay for her medical care and to compensate for the injustice of segregation and discrimination. Brown's original petition focused on the railroad's duty as a common carrier and on Brown's first-class ticket which permitted her to ride in the ladies car.