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  • | Letter

    Letter from John R. Boyle to Samuel B. Reed, November 26, 1860

    In this letter from November 26, 1860, John R. Boyle writes to Samuel Reed from Washington , Iowa describing the character of work on the railroad there. He states that the work is "very light," and approves of the fact that the company "has ordered their expenses very low." He notes that after he paid all of his men he received $2,600 instead of $5,600, but believes all will be well eventually. Boyle also writes that he has not heard back from "those Cedar Rapids people" regarding some work, but he does not believe they have enough money to offer work in any case. He says that not much will be done over the winter with "the country in such a disturbed state."

  • | Letter

    Letter from John R. Boyle to Samuel B. Reed, November 8, 1860

    In this letter from November 8, 1860, John R. Boyle writes to Samuel Reed informing him that he has just finished his work, is "settling" with his men, and will therefore be unable to visit Reed in Joliet, Illinois. He asks Reed to inquire about the nature and pay of some winter railroad work for them both, telling him not to take if for less than 15 cents as he believes "work will be plenty in the spring" and not to "touch it at any price...if they have no money."

  • | Letter

    Letter from John R. Boyle to Samuel B. Reed, October 29, 1860

    In this letter from October 29, 1860, John R. Boyle writes to Samuel Reed discussing his search for railroad employment. He states that they missed out on a contract in Oskaloosa, Iowa, but he remains determined to find work in that area as he believes "there is nothing to be made in this western country now as there is too much competition in the way of RRoading." He notes that there has been much "log rolling" with regard to a 70 mile extension of the Cedar Rapids road, and also tells Reed he is worried he may lose some money on his present work in Washington , Iowa.

  • | Letter

    Letter from John Wood Jr. to Colonel Claudius Crozet, April 20, 1854

    When two slaves were killed on the Blue Ridge Tunnel project, the slaveholders retained legal counsel to negotiate a settlement with the Board of Public Works.

  • Letter from Marion K. McMurphy to Erastus H. Reed, February 26, 1860

    In this letter from February 26, 1860, Marion K. McMurphy writes to her brother, Erastus H. Reed, from Pontoosuc, Iowa discussing family news and the prospect of a railroad being built "from Appanoose to the junction or Burlington the coming summer." She states that she hopes the railroad will "make business a little more lively here as it is very dull on account of hard times in getting money."

  • Letter from Marion K. McMurphy to Samuel B. Reed, September 23, 1863

    In this letter from September 23, 1863, Marion K. McMurphy writes to her brother, Samuel Reed, asking his opinion of employment with the "Union Pacific Railway." She also informs him that she received a letter from their enlisted brother, Erastus H. Reed, who is still doing well.

  • Letter from Oliver Ames to Thomas C. Durant, December 23, 1868

    In this letter from December 23, 1868, Oliver Ames writes to Thomas C. Durant regarding the Union Pacific Railroad's impending acquisition of government bonds. He also discusses the issue of corruption within the company at length, stating "the Road must be costing us very much more than we are getting for it, or everyone out there is stealing." Ames worries that the company will be deep in debt by the time the road is completed and urges Durant to "do Something to Stop the thieves from Stealing our last cent and making the Road suffer."

  • Letter from Oliver Ames to Thomas C. Durant, October 28, 1868

    In this letter from October 28, 1868, Oliver Ames writes to Thomas C. Durant praising him for completing 7 miles and 1,940 feet of track the previous day. He calls it the "achievement of the year," and tells Durant that his work will help expose the Central Pacific Railroad to the public as "Dogs in the Manger." Ames also discusses some of the Union Pacific Railroad's financial affairs.

  • Letter from Peter A. Dey to Samuel B. Reed, April 25, 1864

    In this letter from April 25, 1864, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, writes to Samuel Reed informing him that the Board of Directors has assigned him to survey the land between the Great Salt Lake Valley and Green River in Utah. He states that "President [Brigham] Young has volunteered to furnish you party and transportation for your work." Dey gives detailed descriptions of the areas through which the line will most likely have to be run, telling Reed that "it will be safe to sacrifice distance and straight lines to cost of construction."

  • Letter from Peter A. Dey to Samuel B. Reed, December 10, 1864

    In this letter from December 10, 1864, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, writes to Samuel Reed describing the way in which Reed should prepare his survey report for the Railroad's directors. Dey also mentions that Reed has his full support and that he (Dey) voiced this sentiment to members of the Board.

  • | Letter

    Letter from Peter A. Dey to Samuel B. Reed, December 10, 1864

    In this letter from December 10, 1864, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, writes to Samuel Reed describing the way in which Reed should prepare his survey report for the Railroad's directors. Dey also mentions that Reed has his full support and that he (Dey) voiced this sentiment to members of the Board.

  • | Letter

    Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Brigham Young, November 13, 1869

    In this November 13, 1869 letter, Samuel Reed writes to Brigham Young thanking him for his assistance during the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 30, 1867

    In this letter from December 30, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane advising him of changes to the schedule of production and shipment of railroad ties. He also discusses moving teams of workers to different sections of the line as a means to ensure that work will be completed in time to lay track in the spring.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 30, 1867

    In this letter from December 30, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane informing him of botched contract work east of Cheyenne. He explains what work should have been done, the work that was done, and the difference in cost to the company.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 31, 1867

    In this letter from December 31, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane regarding the status of payments for contract work done on truss bridges.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Henry C. Crane, December 31, 1867

    In this letter from December 31, 1867, Samuel Reed writes to Henry Crane describing the progress of the erection of telegraph lines near Saunders, Nebraska. He states that he cannot find anyone to do the grading work west of the Little Laramie River "at 30," as many who have been doing the grading over the past season have left the area for the winter. He recommends his friend John Boyle for the contract, if Boyle will agree to do the work at the rate of thirty cents.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Jennie Reed, April 2, 1863

    In this letter from April 2, 1863, Samuel Reed writes to his wife to tell her that he is attempting to get through the business of the previous month so that he can come home for a visit, noting that it will likely take him at least another week to complete the work.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Jennie Reed, April 28, 1863

    In this letter from April 28, 1863, Samuel Reed writes to his wife after a visit home telling her that he does not enjoy life away from his family and that "want of money is the only thing that keeps me from resigning my place here and going home." He offers his advice on some family financial matters, and notes that their purchase of land in Oskaloosa, Iowa will soon be worth "all we paid for it." Reed also requests information on the Hayer trial, stating that "even the war news are not looked for with more anxiety than the testimony in the Hayer trial."

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Jennie Reed, April 9, 1863

    In this letter from April 9, 1863, Samuel Reed writes to his wife informing her that he has just learned that he will not be able to start for home that evening as he had planned. A man from Chicago who was supposed to have come the previous week had just arrived to begin making improvements to the truss bridges and Reed must stay to oversee the work. He states that he hopes to leave for a visit home by the very end of the week.

  • Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Jennie Reed, August 13, 1863

    In this letter from August 13, 1863, Samuel Reed writes to his wife to inform her that he will not be able to go home that week as he had intended. Mr. Thielsen has been called to Michigan and Reed states that he cannot leave until Thielsen returns.