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  • | Letter

    Letter from Samuel B. Reed to Jennie Reed, September 29, 1863

    In this letter from September 29, 1863, Samuel Reed writes to his wife describing how busy he has been since his return from a visit home. He notes that he has written to a man on the "Rock Island Road" to inquire about a position which would enable him to be closer to home. Reed also asks his wife if she has heard from his enlisted brother, Erastus H. Reed, since the defeat of Rosecran's army during the Battle of Chickamauga.

  • | Letter

    Letter from Clifford Percival to John H. Devereux, October 13, 1863

    An engineer/machinist escaped from the South inquires about employment opportunities on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad.

  • | Letter

    Letter from W. W. McCafferty to F. P. Lord, November 19, 1863

    McCafferty notes damage done to Engine Rapidan by contrabands.

  • | Letter

    Letter from W. W. McCafferty to J. H. Devereaux, January 29, 1864

    An inquiry about re-hiring a blacksmith for the military railroad.

  • | Letter

    Letter from John Isom to Daniel Craig McCallum, February 18, 1864

    John Isom designates a black church in Nashville to serve as a copper and tin shop.

  • | Letter

    Letter from E. Benjamin to Adna Anderson, February 20, 1864

    E. Benjamin requests passes for black workers so that they may avoid impressment.

  • | Letter

    Letter from A. M. Clapp to Daniel Craig McCallum, March 14, 1864

    McCallum is presented with two female volunteers and asked to provide transportation if their services are needed.

  • | Letter

    Letter from Adna Anderson to Daniel Craig McCallum, July 12, 1864

    A report about the state of the railroads around Nashville in the wake of ongoing guerilla destruction.

  • | Letter

    Letter from J. M. Nash to Adna Anderson, September 13, 1864

    J. M. Nash requests a guard to ensure that the African American engineer at the Lavergne station is not harassed or his work interfered with.

  • | Letter

    Letter from station/road masters to Adna Anderson, October 16, 1864

    Labor bosses ask Adna Anderson to pressure the Quarter Master to approve the sale of winter clothing to contrabands.

  • | Map

    Railroads and war zone counties, 1861?1865

    If the presence of the Union army and/or a battle constituted a war zone, then only in Virginia did the Civil War?s destruction touch the majority of counties. Vast sections of the South remained out of the war zone, but over the course of the war destruction tended to follow closely along the pathways of the major lines of communication and transportation. From Paul F. Paskoff, ?Measures of War: A Quantitative Examination of the Civil War?s Destructiveness in the Confederacy,? Civil War History, Vol. 54, No. 1 (March 2008). (Reproduced with permission of Paul F. Paskoff)

  • | Map

    Field of Operations on the Potomac

    This map from the New York Daily Tribune is an example of the methods newspapers used to help Americans visualize the geography of warfare shaping their perceptions of the war and the landscapes on which it was fought. This map illustrates the position of Union forces along the Potomac just days before many of the troops headed south to begin the Peninsula Campaign.

  • | Map

    The Seat of War in Eastern Virginia

    This map from the front page of the May 6, 1862, New York Daily Tribune helped Americans unfamiliar with the geography of eastern Virginia sort out the landscape and resources associated with the names of towns and railroad junctions coming from newspaper reports. The constant flow of war information and visual representations like this map kept Americans abreast of far-away developments.

  • | Map

    The Battle of Camden, North Carolina / Fort Macon and Vicinity

    Also known as the Battle of South Mills, the Battle of Camden depicted here took place April 19 and the seige of Fort Macon lasted from March 23 to April 26; both were part of General Ambrose Burnside's North Carolina Expedition. On May 6, 1862, these New York Daily Tribune maps provided readers with detailed images of fields of battle and transportation resources hundreds of miles of away - bringing images of warfare and the geography of an enemy region into their homes.

  • | Map

    The Defenses of Yorktown

    In the wake of the Seige of Yorktown (April 5 - May 4, 1862), readers of the New York Daily Tribune are provided with a map and description of the city's defenses, even as they read about the retreat of rebel forces from Yorktown.

  • | Map

    Movements near Corinth, Mississippi

    Although small, this map illustrates the interconnection of railroads and battle lines in the South.

  • | Map

    New York Daily Tribune, May 12, 1862

    This front page image illustrates the importance of maps of space and resources (including railroads) to readers of Civil War-era newspapers. Note the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad running up the center of the larger map; a number of other rail lines criss-cross the map.

  • | Map

    The Seat of War in Eastern Virginia

    During the Peninsula Campaign, the New York Daily Tribune provides readers with a detailed picture of the eastern Virginia; the Table of Distances at the bottom of the map further informs readers about the space and landscape being described in reports and dispatches. Note the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad running up the center of the image; a number of other rail lines criss-cross the map.

  • | Map

    Norfolk and Vicinity

    In the wake of the Battle of Hampton Roads, the New York Daily Tribune prints a map of the waterways and fortifications near Norfolk, Virginia.

  • | Photograph

    African American wood choppers? hut on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad

    African American wood choppers? hut on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad. Black men, many of them formerly enslaved on the South?s railroads, chopped timber for railroad ties, bridges, and fuel for the U.S. Military Railroads. Stationed at remote camps, such as this, they also faced the constant danger of Confederate partisan and guerrilla raids.