Tag Archives: Digital Humanities

Trends in Digital Humanities: remarks at the CIC Digital Humanities Summit (“the keynote in the dark”)

These remarks were presented April 19, 2012 at the CIC Digital Humanities Summit. I have removed and modified some comments which were relevant to the local context of the summit. The power went out and stayed out, so this became … Continue reading

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Doing Humanities in the Digital Age

Today our Digital Humanities graduate readings seminar met with Stefan Sinclair via Skype. This was the third guest visit in our class. We had an earlier session with Robert Nelson on topic modeling and another with Lisa Spiro on the … Continue reading

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Interdisciplinary Readings in Digital Humanities Seminar Syllabus

Today I start teaching a new course at the University of Nebraska in the graduate program. We have started a Certificate in Digital Humanities program for graduate students in History, English, and Modern Languages. With twelve hours of coursework and … Continue reading

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Multi-Dimensional History: Digging into Data NEH presentation, June 9, 2011

Railroads and the Making of Modern America: Tools for Spatio-Temporal Visualization Report to the National Endowment for the Humanities Digging into Data Challenge June 9, 2011 [note: Richard G. Healey, University of Portsmouth, began our presentation with a discussion of … Continue reading

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On “Cyberargument” in Digital Humanities

I propose that we need “cyberargument” as a genre more fully integrated into the digital humanities. We need to recover the rhetoric of interpretation and weave it into the digital form more intentionally and more publicly. Continue reading

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